Amazon Creates 350 Jobs at New Support Center in Costa Rica

The US firm claims to have spent US$10 million on construction of the new center, which will provide a wide-ranging support services to Latin American businesses selling goods on its digital marketplace.

Amazon

US e-commerce giant Amazon has launched yet another Seller Support Center in Costa Rica, creating another 350 jobs.

The US firm claims to have spent US$10 million on construction of the new center, which will provide wide-ranging support services to Latin American businesses selling goods on its digital marketplace.

“Half of the items sold on Amazon worldwide are from small- and medium-sized businesses that offer their products through Amazon Marketplace,” said David Graham, Amazon’s Director of Seller and Vendor Support. “By providing them with first-class support we are helping them grow and expand their businesses.”

The e-commerce firm began its seller support operations in Costa Rica with 30 employees in 2009. Already, more than 900 people are working at the original facility in capital San José.

“We are thrilled that 350 more people can join the team of 900 Amazon associates – it shows the great skills of our talent,” said the country’s President Luis Guillermo Solís Rivera.

Elsewhere in the country, the e-retailer runs several call centers and business support hubs in places including Lagunilla (Ultrapark LAG), San Francisco de Heredia (American Free Zone) and Calle Blancos (Zona Franca del Este).

“We are proud to continue to invest in Costa Rica. We have found great talent here, and have been able to build a great team that shows customer-obsession at its best,” said Alejandro Filloy, General Manager of Amazon Costa Rica.

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Amazon has employed more than 6,500 people in the Central American country, with plans to add 1,500 workers to its payroll by the end of 2018.

Famed as the fifth largest private sector employer in the country, Amazon launched its Costa Rican operations in November, 2008.

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