Mexico-US Cluster Maps Reveal Deep Business Interconnections

The map serves as a framework for understanding drivers of private investment and job creation, identifying geographic concentrations of interconnected companies.

Mexico’s government has released a cluster map uncovering the interconnection of businesses, both manufacturers and service providers, operating in the United States and Mexico.

The map, designed to serve as a framework for understanding drivers of private investment and job creation, identifies geographic concentrations of interconnected companies, suppliers, service providers, and associated institutions across the region.

The United States has welcomed the map, with Commerce Department official, Leslie Wilson, writing in his blog post that Mexico is America’s third largest trading partner, with around $1.5 billion in trade crossing the border every day.

The map is a byproduct of the recently held North American Leaders’ Summit. Following the summit, the U.S. has created similar map and Canada is also in the process of creating one.

Based on a wide array of data such as census reports and occupation surveys, the map helps international companies with creating right business strategy. For countries, it helps to leverage their connections on their way to stoke economic development and create jobs.

Wilsons writes that many of the U.S. and Mexican businesses are deeply integrated. “In fact, a full 40% of the content of Mexican exports is comprised of U.S. inputs. This means that of all the products Americans purchase that are manufactured in Mexico, about 40% of those products’ value-added components are made here in the United States.”

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“The compatibility of the U.S. and Mexican maps is also a critical step toward the development of cross-border economic development strategies that can help drive the sustainable, long-term economic vitality of urban and rural communities along the U.S.-Mexico border,” according to Wilson.

The initiative shows that Mexico-U.S. ties are only getting stronger in the face of Donald Trump’s divisive political rhetoric.