Telus International Acquires Irish Call Center Provider Voxpro

Canadian BPO and ITO operator Telus International has snapped up Irish call center company Voxpro for a reported amount of close to US$176 million.

Voxpro

Canadian BPO and ITO operator Telus International has snapped up Irish call center provider Voxpro. While no financial details of the deal were disclosed, industry insiders estimate the deal was worth close to US$176 million.

Voxpro’s offerings include technical support, customer experience, and sales operations solutions. It also provides data security, analytics, and social media management, according to Telus International.

Approximately 2,700 Voxpro staff, including the leadership team, will join Telus International, bringing the combined employee base at the Canadian firm to almost 28,000.

Once the deal is closed, Voxpro will operate independently but as ‘Voxpro – powered by Telus International’.

The acquisition widens Telus’ footprint in the United States, where Voxpro runs delivery centers in California and Georgia and is winning contracts in new technology sectors, including fintech and internet of things (IoT).

Silicon Valley-based stock trading app Robinhood is said to be the latest to join Voxpro’s roster of clients.

The Canadian firm says Voxpro’s technological assets, coupled with the experience in serving high-end technology firms, would enable it meet the needs of ‘marketplace disruptors’.

Sign up for our Nearshore Americas newsletter:

“Together, we provide a truly differentiated offering in the marketplace designed to meet our fast-growing partner demands for more locations,” said Jeffrey Puritt, Telus International president and CEO.

Analysts say Telus International may soon start offering its omnichannel support, cloud contact center, and analytics services to Voxpro’s clients.

The Canadian firm has employed more than 6,000 people in Central America spanning three sites in Guatemala and one site in El Salvador.

Founded by an Irish couple in 2002, Voxpro has grown fivefold over the past three years, partly because of an increase in contracts from its main clients, including Google, Airbnb, and Nest.

Tags

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

JOIN THE CONVERSATION