US Mulls High-Speed Rail Link to Mexico

Officials from Mexico and the United States are reportedly discussing a plan to build a high-speed railway line between the two North American countries. If agreed, the railroad …

Officials from Mexico and the United States are reportedly discussing a plan to build a high-speed railway line between the two North American countries. If agreed, the railroad will be completed by 2018, according to Fox News Latino.

Once built, trains would take passengers from San Antonio, Texas, to Monterrey, Mexico in less than two hours.

“U.S. Congressman Henry Cuellar, a Texas Democrat, and Texas Department of Transportation Commissioner Jeff Austin, as well as Mexican officials, presented the plan to U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx on Thursday in Washington D.C.,” reported Fox News Latino.

Mexico says it agrees with the plan and has also set aside money to fund the project, which is likely to begin in the first half of 2015. The Mexican Congress is set to pass a bill liberalizing its railroad industry in the first half of this year.

According to Fox News, the idea for the international railway sprung from a Texas Department of Transportation 850-mile study started in September of 2012. The study initially looked into building a high-speed rail between Oklahoma City and southern Texas but has been expanded to include a separate extension of the railway from San Antonio to Monterrey Mexico.

“The study costs $5.6 million dollars, and an additional $400,000 would allow us to extend the study to Monterrey. Once we have route selection then we will begin talking to the private sector,” Texas transportation commissioner Jeff Austin was reported as saying.

The railroad will certainly boost trade between the two nations. Mexico is already the second-largest goods export market to the U.S.

Monterrey is the capital city of Mexico’s northeastern state of Nuevo León, and is a major hubb for traders in both countries.  Moreover, Monterrey is widely regarded as the most “Americanized” city in Mexico.

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